Dating wood floors

Added: Ren Depasquale - Date: 10.12.2021 01:35 - Views: 43339 - Clicks: 8284

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targetedanalyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Antique houses of the 18th and earlyth centuries all tend to have one thing in common: wide-plank floors.

Take a look at a real estate listing for a historic house, and chances are it will tout the floors, which were often hand-hewn and pinned down with forged nails rather than locked into place with tongues and grooves, which is how contemporary hardwood floors are held together. More interesting is that this type of flooring—wide-plank boards—disappear from pervasive use in the second half of the 19th century.

Look to American history. Simply, Dating wood floors was the opportunity for wide-plank floors. These floorboards were often cut via saw pita technique that required two craftsmen to manually slice a tree trunk into sections as the trunk straddled a dug-out pit. The trunks were cut into quarters, and then the planks were cut at a degree angle from those quarters, creating what is referred to as quarter-sawn wood.

This cutting technique, Wilson explains, created the most stable plank. As 18th-andth-century builders and craftspeople worked through the supply of trees and stock depleted, so too did the opportunity to create wider plank floors.

One reason we stopped seeing wide floorboards as the 19th century progressed was simply because material was becoming harder to find. Advancing technologies also contributed to the shift away from wide planks.

As opposed to tongue-and-groove construction, which locks the floor into place, the wide-plank floors were simply nailed down next to each other. This resulted in a lot of seasonal expansion and contraction. Tongue-and-groove floorboards did experience some contraction, but on Dating wood floors whole, they were sturdier," says Baker.

As production of this type of flooring increased, and the ability to ship product from city to city became refined and more efficient, these narrow floorboards could be more easily made, carted across the country, and installed in homes nationwide. Wider planks continued to be used for subflooring, according to Baker, well into the first half of the 20th century. Jefferson's original chess set. This is definitely not a hard-and-fast rule, but more a general observation. With the absence of industrialized tools, though, cutting down trunks into narrow strips of wood was much more labor intensive—and therefore more expensive.

Examples of more intricate flooring tend to exist only in grander properties. Ironically, a lot of the wood Dating wood floors makes up flooring today is ill-suited for wide planks. Many people turn to reclaimed wood for just this reason.

Companies like Olde New England Salvage exist for the purpose of preserving, restoring, and perpetuating antique building materials. Cookie banner We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targetedanalyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from.

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Dating wood floors

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The History of Wood Flooring